How To Catch Walleye In Kentucky

Walleye can sometimes be an elusive creature that forces anglers to think outside the box when trying to catch one on a line. Some days walleye hang out near the top of the water surface. Other days, they are content to lurk in the dark reaches of the water depths. Hiding behind large rocks and gravel overhangs for protection. It all depends on the day and mood of walleye. This white, flaky fish is suited for cold water in the medium water depths with gravel, sand or rock bottom surface.

Kentucky offers up a wealth of lakes and rivers that are home to walleyes of every shape and size. During spawn season, which occurs in early spring, walleye make the trek from the lakes into feeder streams. Other spawning areas include shallow clean surface bottoms that lie within tales reach of deeper waters. Walleye prefer murky water conditions with virtually no current.

One of the best lakes in Kentucky for fishing walleye is Dale Hollow Lake. This 28,000-acre lake is home to big sized walleye. Although the average is four pounds, there have been reports of walleye in excess of ten pounds or more coming from the waters. Situated along the Tennessee-Kentucky border approximately five miles south-west of Albany, Kentucky, Dale Hollow Lake is part of a hearty walleye stocking project. This results in flourishing walleye habitats that produce bigger size and quantities of the fish.

Other great Kentucky lakes for walleye fishing include the Green River Lake that is approximately two miles south of Campbellsville, Kentucky. Located in the central portion of the state, this lake is 8,200-acres in size. Another fantastic walleye hotspot is Lake Cumberland that produced the state record walleye weighing in at 21 lbs 8 oz. Located in the south-central portion of Kentucky, this lake is a massive 63,000-acres in size.

Outside of these, there is Laurel River Lake, which is 6,000-acres and located a mere two miles west of Corbin, Kentucky. Finally, there is Nolin River Lake for Kentucky walleye fishing. This 14,500-acre lake sits in the west-central portion of the state. In addition to lakes, Kentucky boasts a number of impressive rivers for walleye fishing. Some of the more notable ones include Worley and Blue Heron rivers.

The best times to fish in these rivers is nighttime during good moonlight exposure. With the right bait, walleye begin chasing what they think is a shiny minnow moving through the dark waters. Another river hotspot is the Joe Shoal. Sitting approximately one mile downstream from the Blue Heron Coal Mining Community Museum, this river reels in ten to thirteen pound walleye.

Source by Daniel Eggertsen